Category: Digital Culture

Critical Art Digital Culture

Beyond the obsolete models of artist or author as genius and their fetish objects, what collective and collaborative practices are inventing new terrains and flows?

As information and communication technologies saturate our world, how is art giving way to new forms of cultural symbolic manipulation?

Can we identify new models to replace the auteur and the artwork? If so, where do they come from and what might that say about the future of critical practices?

What new kinds of “virtual” spaces are opening up for cultural practice in electronic media? As “old media” begin to collapse under the pressures of the virtual, what new media can we find?

How are didactic illustration and channeled dissidence giving way to new forms of surprise and intensity?

What strategies elude the creative industries’ seemingly infinite appetite for things radical? Are there any strategies that can elude being reduced to styles in the service of sales, or are critical practices doomed to play cat and mouse with the forces of consumerism?
A World-Information Institute event in cooperation with Ludwig Boltzmann Institute/Media.Art.Research and the Austrian Cultural Forum New York (ACF NY)

world-information.org/wii
acfny.org
media.lbg.ac.at

Publication: “Critical Strategies in Art and Media”, Autonomedia 2010

 

Critical Art Digital Culture

THE POLITICS OF SEARCH BEYOND GOOGLE

A Publication of Word-Information Institute

Konrad Becker/ Felix Stalder [eds.] Studienverlag & Transaction Publishers, 2009. 220 pages. ISBN 978-3-7065-4795-6

Information is useless if it cannot be found and it is not a co-incidence that a search engine like Google has turned into one of the most significant companies of the new century. These engines are never just practical tools to deal with information overload. Such cognitive technologies embed political philosophy in seemingly neutral code.

Digital Culture Info Politics